Books To Consider Reading This Fall

Karina Mayer once said, "A book is a magical thing that lets you travel to far-away places without ever leaving your chair."

I don't know how many of you love spending time reading books as much as I do, but there's just something about opening a book and diving into the mind of the author's and imagining the scenes of the book you're reading being played in your head.


A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies... The man who never reads lives only once. ------ George R.R. Martin


I'm not much of a fan of reading books on a tablet or any electronic device, even though it's really convenient in terms of being able to carry it around with you anywhere. I usually spend a majority of my time using electronic devices for school and entertainment which is already bringing a lot of light intensity to my eyes. Therefore, I try as much as possible not read books on mobile devices.

There's something special about holding a book in your hand, feeling the pages physically with your fingers and reading each line word for word. One of my favorite things is when I get to read an old book that has collected so much dust from the library, perhaps it is because I like the smell of dust. 

Anyways, I'm giving you a few books I think you should read this Fall. I believe we should always keep our mind busy; as we all know, we all learn every day and one way to learn is by reading; not necessarily novels, it could be news from social media, magazines and religious books, etc. Now let's dive in.

 

The Prison Letters of Nelson Mandela, by Sanm Venter 

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From the title of this book, you already know this book is about the letters the Late South African President Nelson Mandela wrote during his 27 years in the prison. During his imprisonment, he suffered the loss of his mother and eldest son and was denied attending any of their funerals. These letters were addressed mostly to his wife, children, friends, and fellow comrades. Being a very organized and eloquent man, Nelson Mandela kept records of all the letters he wrote and sent out. His letters were more of admonitions towards his family but he remained resilient despite being in despair. This book opens us to the how he escaped through this despair, taking his time to study law and several African languages while in prison. Nelson Mandela although long gone, his mark on earth will never be forgotten.

 

What a Time to Be Alone, by Chidera Eggegure

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Chidera Eggegure is the founder of the hashtag "Saggyboobsmatter". This book is a guide to help women find their voice and confidence to take charge of the body and life. Chidera gives women a good insight on how to handle being alone and finding peace within us. Having grown up in a Nigerian household and heard several Igbo proverbs from her parents, she used them in her book as a guide to help in women empowerment.

 

Children of Blood and Bone, by Tomi Adeyemi  
 

The Legacy of Orisha #1

The Legacy of Orisha #1

This book is centered in Ilorin and Lagos, Nigeria. The main character is Zélie who is the child of a Maji mother. This book is centered in Ilorin, Nigeria drawing from the author's Nigerian background as well as incorporates the fantasy of both the western and African culture.  Magic is the major topic of this storyline but is painted as a harmful weapon and so the use of magic in Orïsha was restricted. In this book, Zelie is portrayed as an independent lady and exhibits the power of a black woman despite the circumstance she was in. Zelie’s main purpose here is to restore magic back to Orïsha by any means possible so she and others who possess magic can live freely.

 

Welcome to Lagos, by Chibundu Onuzo

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Chibundun Onuzo is a Nigerian novelist who started writing at age 17 and became the youngest female to be taken by a publisher. Her book "Welcome to Lagos" is a book centered in Lagos, Nigeria what focuses on a group of misfit people (Chike and Yemi) who find other runaways who are on their particular mission to gun down innocent civilians. She gives her readers an insight into the streets of Lagos such as overpopulation and perhaps the everyday activities that occur in Lagos. Despite the poverty and corruption that is portrayed in Lagos, Chibundu does great justice in portraying the characters as being resilient in spite of the condition they found themselves in.

These are just a few books I recommend reading when you do have the time. I know a lot of people have resumed school and work may be getting a little bit crazy but having a good book to read helps to take your mind off work or school life.

Leave a comment on books you recommend others to read this fall. Have a beautiful weekend.

Sincerely,

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Favour Epuna